Urinary Calculi & Lithotripsy

Kidney Stones (calculi) in the kidney typically leave the body by passage in the urine stream, and many stones are formed and passed without causing symptoms. If stones grow to sufficient size (usually at least 3 millimeters) they can cause obstruction of the ureter. Ureteral obstruction causes postrenal azotemia and hydronephrosis (distension and dilation of the renal pelvis and calyces), as well as spasms of the ureter. This leads to pain, most commonly felt in the flank (the area between the ribs and hip), lower abdomen, and groin (a condition called renal colic). Renal colic can be associated with nausea, vomiting, fever, blood in the urine, pus in the urine, and painful urination. Renal colic typically comes in waves lasting 20 to 60 minutes, beginning in the flank or lower back and often radiating to the groin or genitals. Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL) – is the process of shattering or breaking up the Kidney Stone into smaller fragments using shock waves. Some cases require more invasive forms of surgery. Examples of these are cystoscopic procedures such as laser lithotripsy or techniques that require access to the organ or tissue via a needle puncture of the skin such as Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is a minimally-invasive procedure to remove stones from the kidney by a small puncture wound (up to about 1 cm) through the skin. It is most suitable to remove stones of more than 2 cm in size and which are present near the pelvic region. It is usually done under general anesthesia or spinal anesthesia.

For other locations use the refine search location field below

Refine Search:

331627_result.jpg

Melbourne

Areas of Special Interest
Urinary Tract symptoms, Raised PSA, Urological Cancers, Laser Stone Surgery, Laparoscopic & Robotic Surgery
Telehealth . . .

Showing 4 results